1 2 3 4 5

I suppose people could blame me for ending Audrey Hepburn’s career. She knew her potential. If she had kept working, the parts were there for her, and her success professionally would have continued at a high level for years. But she wanted to be with her family. She wanted a private life. And she couldn’t bear the thought that she might fail as a mother. It was too important to her.

I remember her long hair, her bare feet, which as a little boy I often caressed while she put her makeup on. Whenever she had to go to a dinner or a cocktail party, she would always say, “Oh, if only I could only stay home and eat in the kitchen with you.” 

I remember school days, cramming for exams for which she probably fretted more than I did. She would test me before bed and again in the morning, waking up with a sort of sleepy head  only adults enjoy. I remember her elation at good grades, her support and positiveness for the “not so good ones”. I remember sleepovers on weekends, when we would chat with the lights out, during those precious few moments before one falls asleep. We would talk about feelings and plans and people and things, but in that way that is specific to that darkness, like two souls suspended. 

I am often asked what it was like to have a famous mother. I always answer that I don’t know. I knew her first as my mother and then as my best friend. She wanted to be a mother very much so when she had the opportunity, she did it to the fullest extent of the law. Audrey Hepburn’s son, Sean Hepburn Ferrer +

vintagegal:

Audrey Hepburn was photographed by Mark Shaw for the June 1954 issue of Mademoiselle.

rareaudreyhepburn:

Audrey Hepburn interviewed by William Leymergie after the Césars on the March 7, 1987, in Paris. She gave the award for best actress and best actor that night. She had been decorated by french minister of culture as a Commandeur de l’ordre des arts et des lettres the day before and a reference to the medal is made here. 

Gifs by Rare Audrey Hepburn. English translation and video by @__AHepburnfan__. Thank you @__AHepburnfan__for finding this video!

In this interview we learn that Audrey’s first language was in fact French!

rareaudreyhepburn:

Audrey Hepburn shopping in Madrid, Spain on March 25, 1964.

* Audrey Hepburn interviewed in Brussels by Selim Sasson c. 1959.

bill-to-my-audrey:

"I’m not that kind of a girl." // requested by anonymous

ourfairlady:

“As the years go on, you see changes in yourself, but you’ve got to face that—everyone goes through it… Either you have to face up to it and tell yourself you’re not going to be eighteen all your life, or be prepared for a terrible shock when you see the wrinkles and white hair.

“[Getting old] doesn’t frighten me, but I wish I didn’t have to, because I like life a lot… You know, one would love to be younger, to have more time. Yet, there’s a big advantage to being older… It’s an excuse in a way to get rid of a lot of the tension you have when you are young… if I were twenty years old, I doubt I’d be able to say that so serenely since I’d have to get out and prove things to myself, make a living and still see the world.”

— Audrey Hepburn

ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio

Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).

Audrey Hepburn with her make-up artist Alberto de Rossi, during the making of How to Steal a Million in Paris, c. 1965

sr